Sunday, July 29, 2007

Supreme Court


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The Supreme Court Justices:

Oral Arguments:

View Supreme Court Oral Arguments as streaming video

About the Court:


Court of Appeals


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The Court of Appeals Judges:

Significant Decisions:

About the Court:


Dakota County

Van A. Brostrom, Court Administrator
Dakota County Judicial Center

1560 Highway 55
Hastings, Minnesota 55033
Phone: 651-438-8100
Email: Dakota@courts.state.mn.us
Business Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

2007 Holiday Schedule

Can't find what you are looking for? Please see the frequently asked questions section.

The following cases are processed in all three court locations in Dakota County: West St. Paul, Hastings, and Apple Valley:

Family, conciliation court, harassments, order for protections, traffic and misdemeanor cases, unlawful detainers/evictions, name changes, divorces.

Cases processed only in Hastings:

Juvenile, felony and gross misdemeanor, adoptions, probate/estates, guardianships/conservatorships,

A new file may be opened at a court location as designated above.

Documents for an existing file must be filed in the location the file was opened or where originally filed.

Notice Criminal Continuance Policy Effective 7-1-2006


Frequently Asked Questions - Jury Service

How was I selected for jury service?

Why must I serve? What happens if I do not serve?

What are the qualifications for jury service?

Who can be excused from jury service?

May I postpone my jury service?

How long does jury service last?

What do I do if I need special accomodations?

Will I be paid for my jury service?

Do I get reimbursed for child care while serving as a juror?

Is jury pay taxable?

Does my employer have to let me leave work to serve?

Does my employer have to pay me while I serve?

Do I get a verification of jury service for my employer?

How was I selected for jury service?

Each year, the Minnesota Judicial Branch obtains names from driver’s license, state ID card and voter registration lists and compiles that information into a composite source list. From that list, individuals are then randomly selected by computer.

Why must I serve? What happens if I do not serve?

The Constitutions of the United States and the State of Minnesota guarantee defendants in criminal cases and litigants in civil cases the right to a trial by jury. As a prospective juror, you have an opportunity to participate directly in a critical component of our democracy.

Prospective jurors who fail to appear are mailed a letter requesting compliance. If there is still a failure to appear, the Chief Judge may issue a bench warrant ordering the prospective juror to appear before the court to show good cause for the failure to appear. Failure to appear for jury service is a misdemeanor.

What are the qualifications for jury service?

A prospective juror must be:

  1. A United States citizen;
  2. A resident of the county;
  3. At least 18 years old;
  4. Able to communicate in the English language;
  5. Physically and mentally capable of serving;
  6. A person who has had their civil rights restored if they have been convicted of a felony;
  7. A person who has not served as a state or federal juror in the past four years.

Who can be excused from jury service?

A person who has received a jury summons will be excused for any of the following reasons:

  1. Not a citizen of the United States;
  2. Not a resident of the county;
  3. Not yet 18 years old;
  4. Unable to communicate in the English language;
  5. Provided a doctor’s note indicating that there is a physical or mental disability preventing jury service;
  6. Has been convicted of a felony and has not had their civil rights restored;
  7. Has served as a state or federal juror within the past four years;
  8. Is a judge currently serving in the judicial branch of government.

A prospective juror who is 70 years of age or older can be excused without providing evidence of an inability to serve, but may choose to serve if able.

May I postpone my jury service?

If the period of time on your summons presents a hardship due to employment, vacation, family business or any other hardship, you can request a deferral of service. Contact your county jury manager to request a postponement.

How long does jury service last?

The length of the term of service varies from county to county, depending on county population. Contact your county jury manager for the specific term of service for your county.

What do I do if I need special accommodations?

If you need special accommodations, such as a sight or sign language interpreter, hearing amplification, or special seating, please contact your county jury manager so they know what type of assistance you will need. If you cannot be reasonably accommodated, you may ask to be excused by providing copies of documents verifying your condition.

Jurors are paid $20 for each day that they report to the courthouse plus roundtrip mileage from home to the courthouse at the rate of 27 cents per mile.

Do I get reimbursed for child care while serving as a juror?

Jurors who are normally caring for their children during the day can be reimbursed for childcare expenses up to $50.00 per day in addition to other fees paid. Ask your county jury manager for more information.

Is jury pay taxable?

The $20 per diem must be reported as income for tax purposes. You must keep a record of the amounts you receive as no tax has been withheld and no W-2 forms are furnished. However, you do not need to report mileage or child care reimbursement as income. 1099 forms are furnished only to those jurors who receive $600.00 or more in juror compensation.

Does my employer have to let me leave work to serve?

Your employer must allow you time off to serve on a jury. That is the law. Minnesota statute prohibits any employer from firing or harassing an employee who is summoned for jury service. However, you must let your employer know well in advance, as soon as you receive your summons. You should contact the court if you have a problem with your employer. Remember that you can postpone jury service to a more convenient time. Read your summons carefully or contact your county jury manager to find out how to request a postponement.

Does my employer have to pay me while I serve?

There is no Minnesota law that requires employers to pay employees while serving jury duty. Some employers do pay normal salaries to employees serving on a jury. You will need to check with your employer. Also, individuals who belong to labor unions may be covered through their union contracts.

Do I get a verification of jury service for my employer?

Upon request, the county jury manager can provide you with a written verification of the days that you reported for jury service.





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